7 Star Trek characters who deserve their own movie

We've seen the in action but not quite front and center. Let's take a look at 7 Star Trek characters that deserve their own movie.

Jeri Ryan as Seven of Nine in "Dominion" Episode 307, Star Trek: Picard on Paramount+. Photo Credit: Trae Patton/Paramount+. ©2021 Viacom, International Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Jeri Ryan as Seven of Nine in "Dominion" Episode 307, Star Trek: Picard on Paramount+. Photo Credit: Trae Patton/Paramount+. ©2021 Viacom, International Inc. All Rights Reserved. /
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Star Trek: Picard Season 3
Michael Dorn as Worf of the Paramount+ original series STAR TREK: PICARD. Photo Cr: Trae Paatton/Paramount+ © 2022 CBS Studios Inc. All Rights Reserved. /

1. Worf

Worf, the mighty Klingon with a softer side, totally deserves his own solo movie. It'd be a movie that dives deep into the life and times of our favorite no-nonsense warrior with a badge of honor as big as a galaxy. Worf isn't just any Klingon - he's a walking, talking (and occasionally grunting) grumpy treasure chest of stories waiting to be told. From his upbringing by human parents on Earth to his struggles with his Klingon identity and honor, Worf's journey takes him through a wormhole. Imagine the epic scenes of him learning to navigate two cultures, finding his place in the Starfleet, and, of course, those moments where he's just trying to understand human humor. The movie could be full of battles, heart, and a dash of awkward Worf moments - because who doesn't love those?

Now, let's not forget the richness of the Klingon culture that a Worf movie could explore. We're talking ancient rituals, fierce battles, and deep-seated traditions that make Klingons the party animals of the galaxy (if the party involved Bat'leths and blood wine). This movie could be a gateway into understanding what it truly means to be Klingon, seen through the eyes of Worf. I can already imagine Worf wrestling with the demands of Klingon honor versus his Starfleet duties, the internal conflicts, the external battles – it's like Shakespeare in space but with more forehead ridges and less iambic pentameter.

And let's be real, who wouldn't want to see Worf in full Klingon battle attire, reciting some guttural Klingon opera before leaping into battle? Worf: The Klingon Chronicles (there, I even named it for you) wouldn't just be a movie - it would be an epic saga of identity, honor, and finding one's path in the stars.